City of Louisville agrees to $12 million settlement in Breonna Taylor shooting


The city of Louisville has agreed to pay Breonna Taylor’s family a record-breaking $12 million in a wrongful death lawsuit as the slain black EMT’s mother called for the officers involved in the shooting to be charged.    

The settlement, which brings an end to the wrongful death lawsuit that Taylor’s mother Tamika Palmer filed against the city and its police department back in April, is the largest amount the city has ever paid.  

In addition to the $12 million, the settlement will also include a series of police reforms for Louisville.  

Among the reforms is a requirement that police commanders must approve all search warrants before they are sent to a judge.  

Taylor, a 26-year-old emergency medical technician, was gunned down back in March when Louisville police burst into her apartment using a no-knock arrest warrant that did not require them to announce themselves. 

The city of Louisville has agreed to pay Breonna Taylor's family $12 million as part of a settlement six months after police shot the black EMT dead in her apartment

The city of Louisville has agreed to pay Breonna Taylor’s family $12 million as part of a settlement six months after police shot the black EMT dead in her apartment 

Taylor's mother Tamika Palmer said on Tuesday that the settlement was significant but it was time to move forward with charging the officers involved in her shooting death

Taylor’s mother Tamika Palmer said on Tuesday that the settlement was significant but it was time to move forward with charging the officers involved in her shooting death 

Her slaying set off weeks of protests, policy changes and a call for the three Louisville Metro Police Department officers who shot Taylor to be criminally charged. 

At a press conference on Tuesday alongside city officials, Taylor’s mother continued to call for charges to be laid against the officers.

‘As significant as today is, it is only the beginning. We must not lose focus on what the real drive is,’ Palmer said. 

‘It is time to move forward with the criminal charges.’ 

One of the officers, Brett Hankison, was fired for ‘blindly’ firing 10 shots into Taylor’s apartment from outside. The other two, John Mattingly and Myles Cosgrove, remain on the force on administrative assignment. 

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron is expected to announce this week whether criminal charges will be filed against the officers involved in Taylor’s shooting death. 

Mayor Greg Fischer said on Tuesday that the city was not waiting for Cameron’s decision regarding any criminal charges. 

‘I’m deeply, deeply sorry for Breonna’s death,’ Fischer said. ‘My administration is not waiting to move ahead with needed reforms to prevent a tragedy like this from ever happening again.’ 

The lawsuit filed by Taylor’s mother alleged that police used flawed information when they obtained the no-knock warrant to enter her apartment. 

Taylor was gunned down back in March when Louisville police burst into her apartment using a  no-knock arrest warrant that did not require them to announce themselves. Pictured above is an evidence photo showing the bullet casings from outside her apartment

Taylor was gunned down back in March when Louisville police burst into her apartment using a  no-knock arrest warrant that did not require them to announce themselves. Pictured above is an evidence photo showing the bullet casings from outside her apartment 

In the crime scene photos, a body camera can be seen on officer Anthony James' right shoulder

Another officer, Myles Cosgrove, can be seen in the photos wearing a body camera holder

In the crime scene photos, a body camera can be seen on officer Anthony James’ right shoulder. Another officer, Myles Cosgrove, can be seen in the photos wearing a body camera holder

Police descended on her apartment after securing a court-approved warrant as part of a drug investigation involving her ex-boyfriend that allowed officers to enter her home without any warning. 

Taylor and her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, had been sleeping in bed when the officers served the warrant at around 1am.

Walker fired his gun when officers stormed into the apartment and has since said he thought he was defending against a home invasion.  

At the time, Walker told police that he could hear knocking on the night of the shooting but did not hear police announce themselves.  

Walker said he was ‘scared to death’ so he grabbed his gun and when the door was knocked down, he fired a shot that ended up striking an officer in the leg.    

Investigators said police were returning fire when they shot Taylor eight times. 

No drugs were found at her home. 

Walker has filed a separate lawsuit against the city that has not yet been settled.  

The settlement is in response to a wrongful death lawsuit that Taylor's mother Tamika Palmer (pictured above during the March on Washington) filed against the city and its police department back in April

The settlement is in response to a wrongful death lawsuit that Taylor’s mother Tamika Palmer (pictured above during the March on Washington) filed against the city and its police department back in April

Taylor and her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker had been sleeping in bed when the officers served the warrant at around 1am

Taylor and her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker had been sleeping in bed when the officers served the warrant at around 1am 

It comes just weeks after crime scene photos emerged publicly that showed a number of shell casings in and near the EMT’s apartment. The photos were taken by Louisville investigators in the hours after Taylor was gunned down. 

The images raised questions about previous statements made by law enforcement who have said there is no body cam footage of the raid because narcotics officers don’t wear cameras. 

Several photos show that at least one officer who raided the apartment was wearing a body camera at the time.

In the crime scene photos, a body camera can be seen on officer Anthony James’ right shoulder. Another officer, Myles Cosgrove, can be seen in the photos wearing a body camera holder.

Immediately after the fatal shooting, police chief Steve Conrad and Mayor Greg Fischer, said no footage existed of the raid because narcotics officers were not required to wear body cameras.

‘This incident was related to the execution of a search warrant by members of our Criminal Interdiction Division and some of the officers assigned to this division do not wear body-worn video systems,’ Conrad, who has since been fired, said.  

The Mayor has repeatedly said that the officers involved in the raid were not wearing cameras.  

At least 10 bullets went into Taylor's apartment through a sliding glass door located in the living room and also through a bedroom window

At least 10 bullets went into Taylor’s apartment through a sliding glass door located in the living room and also through a bedroom window

Bullet holes and blood smeared on the walls could be seen in one evidence photo taken inside the apartment in the hours after Taylor was gunned down

Bullet holes and blood smeared on the walls could be seen in one evidence photo taken inside the apartment in the hours after Taylor was gunned down



Source link